Please Don’t Smile By Malte Wandel

Posted by Suzie Wong | October 20th, 2012 Share

Malte Wandel - Please Don't Smile

Malte Wandel lived for nine months of 2011 in Ghana. Among the other countries he also travelled through were neighbouring Burkina Faso and Togo. During his journeys, he produced a comprehensive series of portraits of people he met and in some cases also got to know personally. Some he photographed spontaneously, while others he visited at home in their familiar surroundings.

In the series Please Don’t Smile, Wandel successfully captures moments of the present in West African towns, from which he highlights certain protagonists and tells their stories. Anna Schneider, curatorial assistant of Okwui Enwezor at Haus der Kunst, writes: “Discreetly, he approaches passers-by, places eccentric individuals and representatives of unknown subcultures centre-frame and allows us an unusual view into life and personalities in today’s West Africa. Directly and unmodified, Wandel’s work deals with a wide variety of characters and the circumstances of their lives – during their hard daily work but also in their leisure time. As well as in the simple FARMER in Kakum (Ghana), on his way with machete and spade into the fields, carrying his lunch in a small metal cooking pot on his head, the series in FOFO shows a young man, with a set of self-made lifting weights in front of him, staring intensely and proudly into the camera, the concrete slab under him appearing to collapse under his weight. OLD SKUUL is the name of a group of youngsters who dress in their leisure time like their forefathers did in colonial times, not African style, but European. Old photographs provide the template for their sometimes absurd interpretations of fashion.

In his full-body photographs, Malte Wandel focuses on the steadfast look into the camera and allows, with the respectful distance, space for individual expression – between humility, pride and confidence. Ghana is West Africa’s great source of hope, but dreams can arise here, too, dreams based on models of the western world. With almost loving care Wandel presents in FOOTBALL PLAYER young amateurs like budding soccer stars. As youths do all over Africa, they dream of being discovered one day by the great football teams of this world and put on a particular set of outfit for every practice match.

Similarly self-aware are the SURFERS of the Ghanaian national team on the beach at Busua. The place has developed its own subculture around a local surfing shop – set up by a US-American NGO – and the young surfers stream out of their shacks carrying their boards whenever the waves are good.

19-year-old Stanley, who earns his living as a Michael Jackson look-alike in the nightlife of Ghana’s capital, Wandel sets against the rocky beach at Accra, transporting him into the world of art and the artist. Here he reveals most strongly the motivation of photographers who work like him, here he clearly distances himself stylistically from pure documentation and invites the observer to reconsider photographic genres as well as the relationship between photographer and the photographed person or subject.”

Malte Wandel - Please Don't SmileMalte Wandel - Please Don't SmileMalte Wandel - Please Don't SmileMalte Wandel - Please Don't SmileMalte Wandel - Please Don't SmileMalte Wandel - Please Don't Smile Flattr this

Tagged with , , ,

The Imaginative World Of Puzzleman Leung

The Imaginative World Of Puzzleman Leung

Imaginative Taipeh-based photographer Puzzleman Leung captures mysterious, humorous and blurred scenes that the young talent creates in his mind. Influenced by Guy Bourdin and Rinko Kawauchi the resulting unique images radiate something timeless as if Puzzleman captured a fleeting moment that might not even took place in real life. With a tendency to "off color" …

Animalia By Kevin Lee

Animalia By Kevin Lee

The word "animal" comes from the Latin word animalis, meaning "having breath". In everyday colloquial usage the word incorrectly excludes humans. Kevin WY Lee’s street photography Animalia is a unique piece of visual documentary, a short poem. In Animalia (disambiguation) the founder of The Invisible Photographer Asia (IPA) gives a imaginative view on the taxonomic …

A Portrait Of Hackney By Zed Nelson

A Portrait Of Hackney By Zed Nelson

The photo book A Portrait of Hackney (Hoxton Mini Press, roughly $21) is a personal reflection on Hackney by photographer Zed Nelson, as it goes through an extraordinary process of gentrification. It’s an intimate look at the ever-changing face of Hackney: the complexity, the contradictions, the clash of cultures. Portraits and landscapes are set against …

Past Forward By Vincent Fournier

Past Forward By Vincent Fournier

In Past Forward (360 Publishing, ISBN 978-9081935708, $65.70), a limited edition book, photographer Vincent Fournier collects the last years of his work on 5 cycles: Space Project, The Man Machine, Tour Operator, Brasilia and Synthetic Biology. Fournier attempts in his images to create allegories of childhood dreams, where reality blends effortlessly with fiction. "The meaning …

Bhumika Bhatia’s Contemporary Indian Diary

Bhumika Bhatia’s Contemporary Indian Diary

Bhumika Bhatia is a portrait photographer from India, catching her dreams in photographs and documenting them in her blogroll. "Sometimes I photograph to vent, sometimes I photograph to drown," she explains. "When I was young, expressing myself was one of the most difficult things for me. I used to let people know about how I …

Presence By Christine Turnauer

Presence By Christine Turnauer

In her photo book Presence (Hatje Cantz, ISBN 978-3-7757-3748-7, $75), Austrian photographer Christine Turnauer (born 1945) captured people and moments in classic black-and-white portraits. Turnauer is a seeker, a wanderer between the worlds. She has been interested in the individuality and diversity of people since her childhood. For her, they are “like snowflakes.” We all …

Comments are closed.