Count For Nothing By Katrin Korfmann

Posted by Peter Nitsch | October 26th, 2012 Share

Katrin KorfmannKatrin KorfmannKatrin Korfmann

In this series of photo collages the progression of time becomes visible by layering several recordings of a given place together to construct a singular image. Various instants in time are being linked as if they took place at the same moment, offering a spatial experience of the progression of time.

Korfmann explains, that “the titles refer to the specific locations or events which took place and are always accompanied by the exact duration during which the recordings are made to delineate a particular frame. The photos which have been taken at sites traversing the globe, are always captured from various perspectives overhead against natural monochrome grounds, such as a green grass field (King’s College (7,5 h_2d) Cambridge), the black tar of a highway (Franks Office (The German Window 40 min.), an expanse of sand/mud (Nickel’s Eye (27 min.) Luanda) or a red carpet (Waiting for Julia (3x 10 min) Berlin).

These monochrome surfaces place the events at first sight in a strikingly abstract context, against which people from disparate cultures seen from above do not necessarily appear so different. But when we scrutinize the figures and events more closely, details such as the goods carried on the heads of people in Luanda, the black robes of the women in Teheran or the slightly different attire of the academic students at the University of Cambridge, help us to localize different habits and rituals very precisely.”

Represented by Kopeikin Gallery, Katrin Korfmann‘s photo, video and installation works are concerned with photographic concepts of framing, perspective, and the social dimensions of perception, such as the relationship between the observer and the observed, the effect of the camera on behavior and the social codes of looking in public environment.

Alice Smits writes, that “an important determinant in her work is time, which is made visible by presenting different sequential incidents which have been registered within a given period and location in a singular spatial arrangement. Korfmann’s work can be characterized by a formal level of composition, structure and spatial-temporal experience, which is aimed at the registration and investigation of social constructions and behavior in public space.” Flattr this

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